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for Teachers and Students
of Chaucer and the Later Middle Ages
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STUDENTS
Daniel T. Kline | U. of Alaska Anchorage
Chaucer Pedagogy | Electronic Canterbury Tales | Chaucer Central
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What's the Next Step?

Although electronic resources for studying Chaucer and the medieval period are continually increasing in quality and sophistication online, in-depth study of late medieval literature, culture, and history still requires dedicated effort offline.  Here are some possibilities.
 
  • Use Online Bibliographies
    . . . to develop a list of academic books and articles you can then look up in your local college or university library (many public libraries also carry a healthy selection of scholarly resources);
  • Read the Work
    . . .  of reputable medievalists, Chaucerians, and other scholars (the Chaucer Pedagogy Page Booklist, in association with Amazon.Com, is a good place to start);
  • Look Up Scholarly Articles
    . . . in a good academic library (or getting them through Inter-Library Loan [ILL] or an online service like Uncover);
  • Talk With Others
    . . . who are interested in Chaucer and the Middle Ages;
  • Form a Reading Group or Study Circle
    . . . of like-minded folks to discuss the medieval literature and academic articles (these are often organized through local community centers, civic groups, and bookstores, or can be done in your own home);
  • Attend a Literary Conference
    . . . where scholars and advanced students present the results of their research (many local colleges and universities have an annual meeting of this sort; check the local paper, community calendar, or campus radio station);
  • Join a Newsgroup or an Electronic Listserv
    . . .
    dedicated to your special interest (if you have an email account, you can find an electronic community who shares your passion);
  • Write About What You Read
    . . .
    keep a reading journal where you can record your responses, compose your own creative works in the style of the works you enjoy most, write a formal essay explaining your opinion or arguing a specific interpretation, or write a poem, a web page or children's story;
  • Take a Course
    . . . at your skill level at a local college, and most importantly,
  • Read and Enjoy the Literature of the Middle Ages
    . . .  whether in translation, or for those so inclined, in Middle English or in another original language.

 

 

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Copyright 1998-2001 Daniel T. Kline & The Kankedort Page All rights reserved.

This page was last revised on 12.21.06.